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Determining the Quality of Door Hardware Sets

Quality of a doorset will determine how long your hardware will last. A big part of quality is determined by how the hardware is manufactured. There are three common methods for creating hardware—stamped brass, cast brass, and hot-forged brass. Learn more here. 

What is the difference between the variety of finishes?

The foundation for a good finish depends on the manufacturing of the product. For example, forged brass allows for a better finish than cast brass. Forging provides excellent detail, which is important when you have intricate embellishments on the hardware. Read the complete article here.

What is the difference between mortise and tubular latches/locks?

It’s important to note that a mortise latch and a tubular latch require two, very different door preparations. Tubular latches require 2 1/8” diameter cross-bores in the door, and 1” edge-bores. Mortise locks require a deep, rectangular pocket in the door. Learn more here. 

What is handing and why is it important?

Door handing refers to the direction the door swings open. When determining handing, stand in front of the public side of the door. Read the complete article here. 

What function do you need for your door hardware?

There are roughly seven different types of functions including privacy, passage, single dummy, double dummy, mortise, entry set and deadbolt. Learn more here.

What measurements do you need to know before purchasing a new set of door hardware?

Backset, bore holes and door thickness for starters. Learn more here.

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Pewabic Pottery

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