Editors' Picks: Old is the New Green

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Our editors highlight new and classic articles, along with favorite products and current bookstore sales. This week, go green!With all the buzz these days around cutting-edge "green" construction, it's easy to forget that preserving old houses is one of the best ways to go green. There's a reason why "reuse" is one of the key tenets of sustainable living—the energy and materials saved by restoring and repairing an old house, rather than tearing it down and starting over, are monumental. And when you combine restoration with sustainably minded ideas, you've got the perfect recipe for green living with a dose of charm. Here, we've highlighted three articles that showcase some of the easiest ways to go green in an old-house way: tune up your original windows, landscape with native plants, and incorporate lots of architectural salvage. Happy greening!

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How To Weatherize Your Windows: Learn how to keep warm throughout the winter with thermal tune-ups for your windows.

Plants for the Arts & Crafts Garden: Arts & Crafts gardeners at the turn of the century and the environmental activists of today have something in common: a love of native plants. Find out how to create a period-perfect (and eco-friendly) garden.

An Adirondack General Store Becomes Home: Homeowners Lauren and Ken Parlin worked with architect Sandra Vitzthum to revitalize an 1880s storefront in the Adirondacks.

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A pendant light over the door adds a stately touch to the ubiquitous Victorian porch; Brass Light Gallery’s London Lantern mimics the design of 19th-century streetlights.

Brass Light Gallery

Interior and exterior architectural lighting for your home and garden, in styles from Victorian to '30s Modern. Select from 15 finish options. Made in USA since 1974. They also have a vintage/antique lighting department, and offer expert restoration services.

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Unico System

A central heating and cooling system using "aspiration" technology to warm and cool homes evenly and quietly with flexible small ducts that weave through ceilings, walls, and even floors.